Solved: Web Cam Error Code 0xA00F4246 (Windows 10)


This quick fix is for those of you trying to run the Windows 10 Camera App to view your web camera. I encountered a situation whereby after plugging in a USB Web Camera, opening the Camera App and waiting a few seconds I was presented with an error message stating: “Something went wrong. If you need it, here’s the error code: 0xA00F4246(0xE8010001)”.

A quick bit of research and I found a really simple registry modification using RegEdit sorted the problem out. Continue reading “Solved: Web Cam Error Code 0xA00F4246 (Windows 10)”


Reset Windows Media Player 12 To Default Settings

I have been having a lot of troubles with my Windows Media Player on Windows 7 but I found this cool trick that allows you to reset WMP12 back to it’s default settings. This might be handy if you are encountering any issues of your own. Continue reading “Reset Windows Media Player 12 To Default Settings”

Fix Corrupted Windows Services After Virus Infection

Yesterday a client rang about a slow computer, it had recently had a virus removed from it but still wasn’t working quite right. Closer inspection revealed that a lot of the Windows Services were corrupted and would not start at all, while others were missing completely!

Some of the error messages that you might run into that are symptomatic of this problem include:

  • Windows Firewall service (MpsSvc): Error Code 5 or Error Code 0x8007042c.
  • Windows Update: Service cannot be started or service is missing from services list.
  • Base filtering engine (BFE): couldn’t be started (Error 5: Access is denied).

Continue reading “Fix Corrupted Windows Services After Virus Infection”

Solved: NVIDIA “Display driver stopped responding and has recovered” Error

Here is a way to possibly solve the annoying NVIDIA “Display driver stopped responding and has recovered” issue which is frequently associated with a flickering screen, flicking to black, having a completely black/blank screen or even rebooting your computer unexpectedly.

This is the method I used to fix a client’s PC which every now and then his monitor would randomly turn black and recover a couple of seconds later with the following error. He was running Windows 7 64-bit but this fix will apply to most other editions of Windows as well.

Upon inspecting the system log in the ‘Event Viewer’ I found that it was the file ‘nvlddmkm.sys’ which was causing the crash. The’ nvlddmkm.sys’ file is located in ‘C:\Windows\System32\drivers’. Continue reading “Solved: NVIDIA “Display driver stopped responding and has recovered” Error”

1 Step Fix for “Cannot start Microsoft Office Outlook. Unable to open the Outlook window.” error

Here is a quick fix to what can be a really frustrating problem.

If when trying to open Microsoft Outlook at you are faced with the “Cannot start Microsoft Office Outlook. Unable to open the Outlook window” error you simply need to go to Start > Run (or hold down the Windows Key and press R on the keyboard) and type in ‘Outlook.exe /resetnavpane’.

Outlook should now open!

I hope this saves someone some grey hairs.

Solved: Can’t Access My Recovery Partition & I Don’t Have Any Recovery CD’s!

Today I was fixing up a laptop for a friend. It was an Acer Aspire 6930 running Windows Vista Home Premium (x86), it appeared that the MBR (Master Boot Record) needed repairing. So using the Vista Recovery CD I was able to use the BOOTREC /FIXMBR and BOOTREC /FIXBOOT commands. Unfortunately that didn’t solve my problem and I needed to access the laptop’s recovery partition, which you would normally get to by holding Alt and pressing F11 during boot up (other laptops have similar key combinations) but I think because I had mucked around with the boot record that the Alt + F11 shortcut was no longer functioning. Continue reading “Solved: Can’t Access My Recovery Partition & I Don’t Have Any Recovery CD’s!”

Recovery Console For XP Without CD: The Easiest Method

Today I was in a bit of a pickle. I needed to use the Windows XP Recovery Console to use the ‘fixboot’ and ‘fixmbr’ commands on a PC that I was repairing but I didn’t have an XP CD handy that included the recovery console. Microsoft provide a utility to make a set of 6 floppy disks to do the job but who uses those anymore? Luckily Dean Adams over at ‘Proposed Solutions’ has come up with a very tidy way of getting to the Recovery Console using two simple bootable ISO images (One is XP SP1 and the other is XP SP2, I am not sure what the difference is but I used the SP2 image). Continue reading “Recovery Console For XP Without CD: The Easiest Method”

Solved: ‘Blue Screen Of Death’ When Booting From WinXP CD

Here is a quick tip for fixing an issue that caused me some grief this afternoon when I was trying to downgrade an installation of Vista back to XP on an ASUS F6A notebook computer. This fix may well apply to a lot of other systems too.

When I tried booting from my WinXP installation disc, the system began loading all the files and drivers as it normally would and then froze and went to the dreaded Blue Screen Of Death or BSOD. After a lot of rooting around it turned out a setting in the BIOS was the cause of the problem.

To fix it, I simply entered the computers BIOS while it was booting up by pressing F2 (most computers use the Del key). I then went to ‘Advanced’ -> ‘IDE Configuration’ -> Changed ‘SATA Operation Mode’ from ‘Enhanced’ to ‘Compatible’ and then Exit & Save Changes by pressing F10.

Boot from your XP CD and voila! It should work.

Happy XPee’ing 😉

How To Safely Turn On A Power Supply Without A Motherboard

Here is a good trick for you tech-heads out there. Quite often you need to test a power supply to see if it is working correctly and sometimes you may not have a computer to connect it to. Fortunately there is a very easy trick to turning a power supply on with just a small piece of wire or paper clip. Continue reading “How To Safely Turn On A Power Supply Without A Motherboard”

Exchange 2007: Listing All Mailboxes & Associated E-Mail Addresses

Command for Exchange 2007 Management Shell to list all mailboxes and e-mail addresses.

This post may be a little obscure but this command helped me out a lot today at work. I was asked to provide a list of all the mailboxes and their associated e-mail addresses that are on our Exchange 2007 Server.

To do this you simply need to open up the Exchange Management Shell and type in the following command:

Get-Mailbox | fl UserPrincipalName, PrimarySMTPAddress, EmailAddresses

You can then right click in the Management Shell window and click on ‘Select All’ and then press the ‘Enter’ key to copy the contents to your clipboard. From there you can do what ever you want with it.

My PC is Frozen: How to Diagnose Faulty RAM

Article first published as My PC is Frozen: How to Diagnose Faulty RAM on Technorati.

Does your computer frequently jam up? Do you seem to be getting a lot of blue screens? You may have faulty memory.

In this article I will try to explain how to diagnose your own faulty memory modules. The process is relatively simple, can save you money and can also be a valuable learning experience if you haven’t had much to do with computer repair before.

The first part of diagnosis is of course being able to recognise the symptoms, which include:

  • The computer freezing up to the point that there is no mouse or keyboard input possible at all.
  • A ‘blue screen of death’ followed by immediate shut down or restart.
  • A failure to boot often accompanied by a series of beeping noises.
  • Crashes during memory intensive tasks such as photo or video editing, gaming etc.
  • Crashes and restarts during Windows installation.

I had the misfortune of experiencing some of these symptoms a few weeks ago when my computer began to freeze during different tasks especially while listening to music on Winamp for a while or within about 5 or 10 minutes of playing World of Warcraft or OFP: Dragon Rising. Luckily for me the fix was easy, all I had to do was remove the side cover from my PC and apply a bit of pressure on each of the memory modules to ensure that they were seated in the DIMM slots correctly. If you don’t know what a memory module or DIMM slot looks like then click on the image above left.

If you suspect that you have faulting memory then ensuring that the modules are pushed properly into the slots would be the first thing that I would try as this is normally the problem 20% of the time. Make sure you check the conditions of any warranty you may have on your PC first as removing the side cover and tampering with components may void it. Continue reading “My PC is Frozen: How to Diagnose Faulty RAM”

Can’t find the right drivers? How to identify unknown devices in Windows

Unknown devices in Device Manager can be really annoying especially if you have lost the driver disc and can’t identify the device at all to download the drivers from the internet.

If you have ever had to reinstall Windows on a PC before then you probably would have encountered this issue.

Unknown devices in Device Manager can be really annoying especially if you have lost the driver disc and can’t identify the device at all to download the drivers from the internet.

Fortunately I have a trick to make identifying those pesky devices much easier without the use of fancy or expensive software. Whether is be audio drivers, video drivers, printer drivers, any kind of drivers!

Simply open ‘Control Panel’ and go to ‘Device Manager’. Right click on the device you want to identify and select ‘Properties’.

In the device properties window select the ‘Details’ tab. There will be a ‘Property’ drop-down box from which you need to select ‘Hardware Ids’.

In my example I have the value ‘PCIVEN_8086&DEV_109A‘. (See image).

This is the information you will need to identify your device. (The device in this example has already been identified and drivers installed as I didn’t have any Unknown Devices to use as in my screenshot.)

A simple Google search of ‘VEN_8086&DEV_109A’ reveals that my device is an Intel PRO Network card and also a few websites where I can download drivers. Please know that this method doesn’t always neccessarily pin-point your device 100% of the time and some trial and error may be required but it will at least point you in the right direction.

I hope this was helpful and if you have any questions please leave me a comment.